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Rudolf Rocker and the Will to Power, Part 1

by George H. Smith January 2014

In Nationalism and Culture, a classic history of libertarian ideas, Rudolf Rocker uses the struggle of freedom against power as his theoretical framework.

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The Lust for Power

by George H. Smith January 2014

Smith explains how the insatiable desire for power and its corrupting influence have been dominant themes in libertarian theory and history.

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The Radical Abolitionists, Part 2

by David S. D’Amato January 2014

D’Amato looks at the Garrisonians, the most diehard and arguably most consistently libertarian of the abolitionists.

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Ideas, Human Action, and Social Change

by George H. Smith January 2014

Smith explores various ways in which ideas influence human action, and why ideas are essential to the success of libertarianism.

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Why Did Hayek Support a Basic Income?

by Matt Zwolinski December 2013

Hayek endorsed a guaranteed minimum income—but didn’t say why. In this essay, Matt Zwolinski attempts reconstruct Hayek’s argument.

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State and Society, Part 3

by George H. Smith December 2013

Smith, drawing from Machiavelli’s The Prince, discusses two essential ingredients of successful states.

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State and Society, Part 2

by George H. Smith December 2013

Smith explains the meaning of “society” and “institution,” and he discusses the distinction between designed and undesigned institutions.

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The Libertarian Case for a Basic Income

by Matt Zwolinski December 2013

Guaranteeing a minimum income to the poor is better than our current system of welfare, Zwolinski argues. And it can be justified by libertarian principles.

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State and Society, Part 1

by George H. Smith December 2013

Smith discusses some preliminary issues involved in the classic libertarian distinction between the spheres of “state” and “society.”

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The Radical Abolitionists

by David S. D’Amato December 2013

The radical libertarian abolitionists thought it was senseless to attack slavery while defending the institutions that upheld it.