January 6, 2012 Around the Web

Andrew Jackson: The First Imperial President

According to Professor Amy H. Sturgis, Andrew Jackson frequently appears in top ten lists of great Presidents of the United States. The following reasons are often given to justify Jackson’s high ranking among Presidents:

1) Jackson was a champion of the common man
2) Son of the frontier
3) A war hero
4) An enemy of the elite
5) A champion of the United States Union.

Sturgis argues that most of these reasons are in fact myths when they are analyzed in greater depth. For instance, Jackson engaged in several unauthorized activities during war like invading foreign territory that he was not authorized to invade and executing non-US citizens he was not authorized to execute.

Additionally, many of the reform efforts that came out of the so-called Jacksonian revolution made Jackson appear as a champion of the common man. However, the Jacksonian revolution did not align with Jackson the leader or Jackson the man. For instance, part of the Jacksonian revolution was the abolition movement, yet, Jackson himself owned salves until the day he died.

Jackson’s battle with the National Bank, Sturgis argues, gave the illusion that Jackson was an enemy of the elite. Although Jackson was constitutionally sound in challenging the National Bank, his reasons for doing so were more personal, rather than legal.

For more, visit LearnLiberty.org.