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Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 88: The Secession Conventions

featuring Anthony Comegna on Jan 8, 2019

The complicated time of secession was defined by politicians’ desire to grab power in any way that they could. 

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 87: Profiles in Locodom: Fernando Wood

featuring Anthony Comegna and Nicholas Mosvick on Jan 1, 2019

Nicholas Mosvick joins us to discuss the complexity of Fernando Wood, the mayor of New York who wished the state seceded during the Civil War. 

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 86: Eggnog Riot!!!!

featuring Anthony Comegna on Dec 25, 2018

Merry Christmas! We hope you didn’t stage a riot last night on Christmas Eve, because, as you know, Santa is always watching!

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 83: Who Killed Jefferson(ianism)?

featuring Anthony Comegna on Dec 4, 2018

Those who profited so much from slave labor, rebuked the Declaration of Independence, but the Southern justification for slavery varied by region. 

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 82: The Constitution & Castle Walls

featuring Anthony Comegna on Nov 27, 2018

Southerners strategically supported a small & limited national government, but their motives for doing so were appalling. 

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 80: Libertypublicans

featuring Anthony Comegna on Nov 13, 2018

During the speakership crisis, political party lines were strictly defined by the slavery issue, which only inched the country closer to civil war. 

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 78: Hinton Help Us!

featuring Anthony Comegna on Oct 30, 2018

Hinton Helper is the embodiment of everything that was wrong with Republican Party politics from the time of Free Soil and beyond. 

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 74: The Greatest of Nullifiers

featuring Anthony Comegna and Caleb O. Brown on Oct 2, 2018

How did Justice Abram Smith of Wisconsin challenge the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850?

Liberty Chronicles

Ep. 72: There’s No Excuse for Slavery (Updated)

featuring Anthony Comegna on Sep 19, 2018

This is an updated version of our episode from July 3, 2018. We discuss how John C. Calhoun led the charge in believing slavery to be a “positive good”.