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Are Taxes a Democratic Alternative to Charity?

by David S. D’Amato on Oct 12, 2018

Progressives provide confused narratives about taxation, justice, and the popular will because they misunderstand what the democratic state is.

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Libertarianism, Then and Now

by Anthony Comegna on Oct 3, 2018

On Camilo Gomez’s History and Politics podcast, Anthony discusses rooted libertarian history and the magnitude of our current problems.

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Is America the Most Fearful Country in the World?

by Natalie Dowzicky on Oct 2, 2018

American exceptionalism predisposes Americans to feel like both the “world’s premiere power and supreme worrier” according to Christopher Fettweis. 

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Samuel Johnson and His Dictionary

by George H. Smith on Sep 28, 2018

This is the second part of Smith’s discussion of how Samuel Johnson made a living as a free-lance writer in 18th century London.

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Samuel Johnson: Hack Writer Extraordinaire

by George H. Smith on Sep 21, 2018

Part one of a lengthy article on Samuel Johnson, originally written in 2001, is a result of my interest in freelance, or market, intellectuals.

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A Review of Posner and Weyl’s Radical Markets

by David S. D’Amato on Sep 14, 2018

A new book from Eric Posner and E. Glen Weyl avoids many mistakes commonly seen in modern arguments, only to resurrect other, long-buried, errors.

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Do Socialists Mean Well?

by Grant Babcock on Sep 11, 2018

Because fascists have evil ends in mind, their malevolence is obvious. For socialists however, their ill intent is more insidious.

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John of Salisbury: A Politics of Virtue

by Paul Meany on Sep 7, 2018

The medieval thinker John of Salisbury explored the relationship between virtue and the state, concluding that the good life requires freedom.