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How the Anti-Federalists Shaped the Constitution

by David Edwards on Mar 4, 2020

The Anti-Federalists had a strong distrust of government power. A national government with too much power was, as far as they were concerned, a pathway to government oppression. 

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Trump the Decider

by Gene Healy on Jan 29, 2020

War powers practice in the early republic suggests that the president’s power of “self‐​defense” was far narrower than Trump’s defenders imagine.

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John Lewis, Libertarian Hero

by Michael F. Cannon on Jan 21, 2020

Few in the libertarian movement have suffered as much as Lewis for the cause of freedom.

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Why 1619 Matters in 2019

by Matthew Feeney on Aug 19, 2019

The most prominent of America’s contradictions is that its Founding documents were written by white men who owned black human beings as farm equipment, yet they expressed a commitment to liberty. 

Everything Wrong with the Presidents

Everything Wrong with the Buchanan Administration

by Ellen Kelly on May 28, 2019

President Buchanan amassed the largest fiscal imbalance of a pre-Civil War administration not engaging in a foreign war and that fact only scrathes the surface of his shortcomings.

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Radical Weirdness in the English Civil Wars

by Anthony Comegna and Caleb O. Brown on Jan 5, 2019

Caleb Brown interviews Anthony Comegna about the English Civil Wars and high weirdness in the primitive libertarian tradition.

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Leland Yeager: In Memoriam

by Steven Horwitz on May 1, 2018

Horwitz remembers the life and thought of Leland Yeager (November 4, 1924 – April 23, 2018).

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Moncure Conway’s Fall from Grace

by George H. Smith on Apr 13, 2018

How was the abolitionist Moncure Conway widely criticized by other American abolitionists for his peace proposal that would end the Civil War?

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Gradualism and the Republican Party

by George H. Smith on Mar 16, 2018

Smith discusses plans for the abolition of slavery by radical members of the Republican Party.