Explore

William Lloyd Garrison

An ardent abolitionist and supporter of the women’s suffrage movement, William Lloyd Garrison is perhaps best known as the editor of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, and as one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

columns

The Radical Abolitionists, Part 2

by David S. D’Amato on Jan 7, 2014

D’Amato looks at the Garrisonians, the most diehard and arguably most consistently libertarian of the abolitionists.

columns

More on Garrison and the Civil War

by George H. Smith on Mar 23, 2018

Smith explains why Garrison, an avowed pacifist, supported the North during the Civil War.

columns

The Radical Abolitionists

by David S. D’Amato on Dec 2, 2013

The radical libertarian abolitionists thought it was senseless to attack slavery while defending the institutions that upheld it.

columns

Abolitionism and Self-Ownership

by George H. Smith on Jan 13, 2017

Smith discusses the crucial role played by the inalienable right of self-ownership in the abolitionist crusade to abolish slavery.

columns

Garrison on the Right of Secession

by George H. Smith on Mar 2, 2018

Smith discusses what Garrison meant by the “right of secession,” and how he reconciled his views with his condemnation of secession by the southern states.

columns

The Liberty Party

by George H. Smith on May 14, 2018

Smith discusses some circumstances that led to the formation of the abolitionist Liberty Party in 1840.

columns

Abolitionism: The Schism Over Voting

by George H. Smith on Jan 27, 2017

Smith discusses the split in the American Anti-Slavery Society over voting, equal rights for women, and other causes.

columns

Final Comments on Wendell Phillips and Non-Voting

by George H. Smith on Apr 7, 2017

Smith concludes his discussion of the no-voting theory of Wendell Phillips by explaining Phillips’s attitude toward taxes and the limits of democracy.

columns

Some Background on the Prohibition Movement

by George H. Smith on May 26, 2017

Smith explains some reasons why the temperance movement switched from advocating voluntary methods to calling for coercive prohibitory laws during the 1830s.