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Interventionism

by Sanford Ikeda on Aug 15, 2008

Government interventionist policies are aimed to solve perceived problems of the completely free market but often result in harmful over-regulation.

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Laissez-Faire Policy

by Bryan Caplan on Aug 15, 2008

Libertarians believe that laissez-faire policy, or the freest form of economy, provides the greatest net benefit to individuals and to society.

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Paternalism

by Will Wilkinson on Aug 15, 2008

Paternalism in law-making is where the government makes decisions for individuals based on what the government thinks is best for them.

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Political Parties

by Patrick Basham on Aug 15, 2008

Political parties can help to inform voters and overcome collective action problems, but also institutionalize government vote-seeking and rent-seeking.

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Rule of Law

by Norman Barry on Aug 15, 2008

The rule of law keeps society protected and in order by holding everyone – including government – accountable to objective standards of behavior.

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Term Limits

by Eric O'Keefe on Aug 15, 2008

Term limits played a crucial role in early US state governments. While a standard for executives, term limits are still debated for members of Congress.

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Anarcho-Capitalism

by Andrew Morriss on Aug 15, 2008

Anarcho-capitalism is a form of anarchism where market actors provide all goods and services to society, including security and common public goods.

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Bureaucracy

by Paul Dragos Aligica on Aug 15, 2008

Bureaucratic organizations rely on hierarchal structures and uniform processes to accomplish tasks, an organization approach that libertarians critique.

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Capitalism

by Stephen Davies on Aug 15, 2008

Capitalism is the economic system in the majority of modern democracies today, in which the private ownership, exchange, and use of property is promoted.

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Collectivism

by Jeremy Shearmur on Aug 15, 2008

Collectivism advocates state control over the economy and civil society. Philosophically, collectivism resembles socialism and opposes individualism.

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Communism

by Michael Chapman on Aug 15, 2008

Communism is the political system in which all aspects of life are planned by the state. Its presence has been devastating for millions of people.

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Consequentialism

by Terry Price on Aug 15, 2008

Consequentialism, meaning that consequences matter above other aspects of decision-making, allows for greater attention to detail in policy analysis.

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Conservatism

by George Carey on Aug 15, 2008

In this entry, George Carey explores the founding principles of conservatism and the ways in which they can be seen in modern conservative thought.

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Conservative Critique of Libertarianism

by Edward C. Feser on Aug 15, 2008

Edward C. Feser outlines some common arguments conservatives raise against libertarians and how those criticisms have affected both movements.

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Contractarianism/Social Contract

by Jan Narveson and David Trenchard on Aug 15, 2008

One common model of state formation, the social contract consists of the voluntary exchange of protection and rights between governments and citizens.

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Delegation

by David Schoenbrod on Aug 15, 2008

Delegation from the legislature to executive bureaus and others grants these groups additional powers, often at the result of decreased accountability.

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Democracy

by Randall G. Holcombe on Aug 15, 2008

In this entry, Randall Holcombe overviews the ideals, strengths, and weaknesses of democracy, particularly as it occurs in states today.

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Enlightenment

by Stephen Hicks on Aug 15, 2008

The Enlightenment brought a wave of philosophical ideas, including classical liberalism, scientific progress, and social and religious tolerance.