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Conscription

by Doug Bandow on Aug 15, 2008

Conscription, or mandatory military service, has been implemented a number of times in U.S. history, but often under incomplete justification.

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Mercantilism

by George H. Smith on Aug 15, 2008

Mercantilism was the idea that wealth of nations was based on the amount of money held by the nation through internal protections and a focus on exports.

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Secessionism

by Jason Sorens on Aug 15, 2008

In this entry, Jason Sorens considers the potential costs, benefits, and moral implications of secessionism and constitutionally allowing secession.

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War

by Robert Higgs on Aug 15, 2008

War is often costly both to the nation and to individual liberties. Most libertarians are skeptical of war or see it as a necessary evil.

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MacBride, Roger Lea (1929-1995)

by David Boaz on Aug 15, 2008

With his electoral vote in 1972 and presidential campaign in 1976, Roger Lea MacBride expanded the influence of the Libertarian Party. 

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Peace and Pacifism

by Robert Higgs on Aug 15, 2008

In this entry, Robert Higgs outlines public opinion of war throughout American history and the stances the government took to anti-war sentiment.

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Clark, Ed (1930-)

by David Boaz on Aug 15, 2008

The 1980 Libertarian party presidential candidate, Ed Clark is a public figure for the libertarian movement who played an important role popularizing it.

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Economics, Keynesian

by Daniel B. Klein on Aug 15, 2008

Keynesian economists theorize that government spending can be used to manage the economy. It has been a widely accepted stance since the 1930s.

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Ricardo, David (1772-1823)

by Mark Skousen on Aug 15, 2008

David Ricardo was an influential economist whose contributed both important free-market theories and dismal predictions about the value of labor.

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Say, Jean-Baptiste (1767-1832)

by David Hart on Aug 15, 2008

Say was a French political economist whose work anticipated and popularized theories of wealth creation, entrepreneurship, and a free society.

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Law and Economics

by Andrew Morriss on Aug 15, 2008

The “law and economics” approach, used by Coase, Posner, and others, combines the methods and principles of both law and economics scholarship.

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Coase, Ronald H. (1910-2013)

by Douglas MacKenzie on Aug 15, 2008

The work of Ronald H. Coase, most famously the concept known as Coase’s theorem, has provided insight to law, economics, and how they intersect.

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Contractarianism/Social Contract

by Jan Narveson and David Trenchard on Aug 15, 2008

One common model of state formation, the social contract consists of the voluntary exchange of protection and rights between governments and citizens.

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Hume, David (1711-1776)

by Jan Narveson and David Trenchard on Aug 15, 2008

One of the chief philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, Hume contributed a theory of government and morality loosely based on property and utility.

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Nonaggression Axiom

by Roderick T. Long on Aug 15, 2008

The nonaggression axiom or principle mandates that individuals do not use physical force against others or their property, except for retaliation.

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Positive Liberty

by Tibor Machan on Aug 15, 2008

Positive liberty presents liberty as the ability to succeed. Often, though, positive liberty can only be achieved by violating negative liberty.

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Common Law

by Andrew Morriss on Aug 15, 2008

Common law describes the form of law used to resolve disputes between individuals where decisions are made based on intent, effects, and circumstances.

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Dicey, Albert Venn (1835-1922)

by Stephen M. Sheppard on Aug 15, 2008

A. V. Dicey, a prominent British legal philosopher, established in his writings the basic principles for the rule of law under a legitimate constitution.