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Sexuality

by Wayne Dynes on Aug 15, 2008

Libertarians believe in sexual freedom, where consensual sex acts that pose no harm should not be prohibited by society or legislation.

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Cobden, Richard (1804-1865)

by John M. Brady on Aug 15, 2008

One of the leaders of the Anti-Corn Law League, Richard Cobden is considered an example of a liberal thinker with considerable success in changing British policy.

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Antitrust

by Donald J. Boudreaux on Aug 15, 2008

Antitrust legislation seeks to break up big companies and industry monopolies in order to keep markets competitive, but sometimes favors narrow interest groups.

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Natural Law

by Fred Miller on Aug 15, 2008

Natural law theorists explain that all man-made law should derive from some universal law of nature, discovered either through divine inspiration or human reason.

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Wealth and Poverty

by Dwight R. Lee on Aug 15, 2008

Wealth is born from production and meeting the demands of the market. As such, liberty encourages wealth, while government over-regulation may destroy it.

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Rights, Natural

by Fred Miller on Aug 15, 2008

Natural rights are the basic rights held by all individuals by merits of being human; i.e., those rights that exist pre-government and may not be violated.

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Psychiatry

by Jeffrey A. Schaler on Aug 15, 2008

Libertarians are skeptical of some approaches to psychiatry especially when it involves government or when patients are coerced into accepting treatment.

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Prohibition of Alcohol

by Jackson Kuhl on Aug 15, 2008

The Prohibition of alcohol, from 1919-1933, though intended to reduce alcohol consumption, merely made alcohol consumption more dangerous.

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Subsidiarity

by Nigel Ashford on Aug 15, 2008

Subsidiarity is decentralized, bottom-up decision-making. Libertarians support decentralization that places the individual in charge of their own decisions.

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Federalists Versus Anti-Federalists

by Jeffrey Rogers Hummel on Aug 15, 2008

One of the major debates over the U.S. Constitution was between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, largely over the role of the states and a Bill of Rights.

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Corruption

by John Samples on Aug 15, 2008

Corruption in government is a widely discussed issue, as its impacts on government effectiveness impact democratic institutions and individual liberty.

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Physiocracy

by George H. Smith on Aug 15, 2008

The physiocrats were French laissez-faire economists in the late 18th century who based their policies and writings on natural reason and science.

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Cantillon, Richard (c.1680-1734)

by George H. Smith on Aug 15, 2008

A notable early economist, Richard Cantillon is influential for his theories on the self-regulating market, entrepreneurship, and prices.

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Retribution for Crime

by Eric Mack on Aug 15, 2008

Retributive justice holds that punishment is the only way to achieve justice and properly disincentivize criminal behavior, but to explain why, opinions differ.

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Freedom of Thought

by George H. Smith on Aug 15, 2008

Freedom of thought includes the notion that religion and personal value systems should be unregulated, and that expressing all values must be permitted.

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Children

by Maureen Kelley on Aug 15, 2008

In this entry, Marueen Kelley explains some libertarian takes and positions on social issues in which children become the focus of discussion.

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Stoicism

by Roderick T. Long on Aug 15, 2008

Stoicism was a philosophical movement in Ancient Greece and Rome based on rational self-discipline, virtue, and natural law as the basis for state authority.

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Cosmopolitanism

by Tom G. Palmer on Aug 15, 2008

Cosmopolitanism, or globalization, encourages the individual to act as a citizen of the world, not just of a closed nation-state or community.