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Crusaders, Inventors, and Classicists

by Condorcet in 1795

While Renaissance artists and intellectuals rediscovered, revived, and revered, tinkering inventors drove progress into its next epochal period. 

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The Decline and Fall of Ancient Empiricism

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet believed secular sectarianism was the primary cause of ancient philosophy’s decline, but Christian dogmatism sure didn’t help.

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Anarchiad, a New England Poem: Part 5

by Various Authors on Sep 13, 1787

Federalists didn’t respect Democrats; Democrats hated Federalists. Libertarians know neither can be trusted with power.

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Anarchiad, a New England Poem: Part 4

by Various Authors on May 24, 1787

Our series climaxes with Hesper’s victory over the Anarch, published just as the Philadelphia Convention began.

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The Greek Republic of Letters

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet surveys the widely-distributed, decentralized, yet deeply interconnected ancient Greek ‘Republic of Letters.’

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The Writing Revolution

by Condorcet in 1795

The invention of agriculture was certainly epochal and revolutionary, but writing dramatically sped up the course of progress.

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Progress and Perspective

by Condorcet in 1795

Our author covers barbarian hordes and pastoral-nomadism and we recall that the past is a place historians interpret into existence.

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The Second Fiery Flying Roll: Base Things

by Abiezer Coppe on Jan 4, 1649

For Coppe’s second rant, he targets the notion that some behaviors are innately sinful. All creation, he says, leads the faithful closer to God.

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The Putney Debates: Ireton’s Case

by Various Authors on Oct 29, 1647

Against the levelling impulse in the New Model Army, General Ireton argues that only those with fixed local interests should exercise political power.

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Slavery, Sin, and Satan

by Levi Hart on Sep 20, 1774

Having defined and described liberty, Hart exposes the sin of slavery, and the slaveholder’s own bondage to Satan.

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Reclaiming the Commons: Digger Principles

by Various Authors 1649

Gerard Winstanley and the Diggers took direct action to reclaim the commons and level the rights, powers, and privileges unjustly granted to a few aristocrats.

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The Encantadas: Two Sides to a Tortoise

by Herman Melville in 1856

In his literary sketches of the Galapagos Islands, Melville sees a lens through which individuals can fully explore existence, power, liberty, and responsibility.