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Anarchism and American Traditions

by Voltairine de Cleyre in 1908

Voltairine De Cleyre reappraises the legacy of the American Revolution through an individualist anarchist lens.

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The Depths of Mutual Hate

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Mar 24, 1862

Ingersoll tries to revive the Second Party System’s spirit of compromise—one marked by wilful ignorance of slavery, its horrors, and its legacy.

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The Plague of Confederacies

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Mar 24, 1862

Ingersoll defends the traditional existence of secession throughout American history, but ultimately condemns it as inadvisable and rash.

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The Virtues of Compromise

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Mar 24, 1862

“Copperhead” Democrat Charles Jared Ingersoll argues that both warring sections should embrace a large measure of compromise and conciliation.

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Three Kinds of Troublesome Northerners

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Mar 24, 1862

Fearing for his country’s existence, Ingersoll chastises northern warmongers, their thoughtless voters, and reckless activists.

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The Lightning Rod Man

by Herman Melville in 1856

Melville’s short story echoes his generation of artists’ widespread fears for America’s future. Without sufficient individual virtue, could polite society survive?

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You Are a Man And So Am I

by Frederick Douglass on Sep 3, 1848

Frederick Douglass argues that slavery “destroys the central principle of human responsibility” and violates the Constitution in three short essays.

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Democracy vs Doulocracy, Part 2

by William Wilson in 1848

After defining his terms, our author shifts to a full explanation of slavery’s sinful violations of Christian precepts.

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This is All Fanaticism–Wait and See

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers July-September 1838

Our study begins with a frank discussion of slavery, its impact on American life, and the constitutionality question.

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Rep. Charles Goodyear: A Lost Anti-Imperialist

by Charles Goodyear on Jan 16, 1846

In his “Speech on the Oregon Question,” New York Representative Charles Goodyear stood for a small republic in the face of continental imperialism.