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A Virtue Ethical Case for Libertarianism

by Mark LeBar on Jan 3, 2017

Libertarian political institutions are most conducive to virtuous living, and virtuous people will be inclined to uphold libertarian principles.

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Crusaders, Inventors, and Classicists

by Condorcet in 1795

While Renaissance artists and intellectuals rediscovered, revived, and revered, tinkering inventors drove progress into its next epochal period. 

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After Nestor: The Popery of Gold!

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker compares the human idolatry of gold to religious worship, looking forward to the day when every man pulls his own metals from the sea.

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After Nestor: Between Communism & Monopoly

by Benjamin Tucker and Auberon Herbert in 1897

Tucker rejoins the trans-Atlantic dialogue between his American Spoonerite anarchists and the English Individualists.

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There’s No Tyranny Like English Tyranny

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Aug. 1840-March 1841

Offering his dismal reflections on the World Anti-Slavery Convention, Rogers reminds readers that the abolitionist revolution is no bureaucratic body.

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“The Lexicography of Hell”

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Dec. 1839-April 1840

Rogers explains how northerners, too, were complicit in slavery and cautions that political revolution alone would not create an abolitionist society.

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“Amidst the Universal Darkness”

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet surveys the dismal feudal era, but highlights its greatest triumph—the libertarian moment when slavery disappeared across Europe.

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The Decline and Fall of Ancient Empiricism

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet believed secular sectarianism was the primary cause of ancient philosophy’s decline, but Christian dogmatism sure didn’t help.

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After Nestor: A Smattering of Subjects

by Benjamin Tucker on Nov 1, 1897

In a troubling set of quotations, Tucker derides age of consent laws, displays plenty of misogyny, and shows more concern for butter than child welfare.

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After Nestor: Liquor & Tariffs

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker squares off with a reader and fellow editor who suggests some monopolies are necessary for liberty to thrive.

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Anarchiad, a New England Poem: Part 5

by Various Authors on Sep 13, 1787

Federalists didn’t respect Democrats; Democrats hated Federalists. Libertarians know neither can be trusted with power.

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Anarchiad, a New England Poem: Part 4

by Various Authors on May 24, 1787

Our series climaxes with Hesper’s victory over the Anarch, published just as the Philadelphia Convention began.

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After Nestor: The Woes of an Anarchist

by Wordsworth Donisthorpe and Benjamin Tucker in 1897

In a delightful display of trans-Atlantic libertarianism and radical individualism, Wordsworth Donisthorpe pours out his troubled soul.

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Anarchiad, a New England Poem: Part 3

by Various Authors March/April 1787

The Wits foretell the end of Shays-ism as they look forward to the impending Constitutional Convention.

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Anarchiad, a New England Poem: Part 2

by Various Authors on Jan 11, 1787

Old Anarch, master of chaos, marshalls his forces and rallies them for battle against Hesper, Nymph of the West.

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The Greek Republic of Letters

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet surveys the widely-distributed, decentralized, yet deeply interconnected ancient Greek ‘Republic of Letters.’