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Hannibal on the Amistad

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Aug-Dec, 1839

Rogers introduces Cinques and the Amistad rebels, who showed that a chance at liberty and autonomy was more precious than life under slavery.

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How Stands the Case?

by John L. O'Sullivan Sept. 1838

In the most difficult period for his party and his movement since their inceptions, John L. O’Sullivan attempted to brace up the troops and squeeze out a victory.

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A Jaunt to Vermont

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Oct. 1838-January 1839

Rogers takes us on a transcendent yet rugged tour of Vermont, a land virtually untouched by the scourge called “Colorphobia.”

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This is All Fanaticism–Wait and See

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers July-September 1838

Our study begins with a frank discussion of slavery, its impact on American life, and the constitutionality question.

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The Influence of America on the Mind, Part III

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Oct 18, 1823

Ingersoll concludes by examining religious liberty in America. He goes so far as to single out Catholics for their enormous contributions to American life.

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The Influence of America on the Mind, Part II

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Oct 18, 1823

Ingersoll moves to discuss the American contributions to practical life in an era when great efficiency yielded greater power and influence.

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The Influence of America on the Mind, Part I

by Charles Jared Ingersoll on Oct 18, 1823

Presaging the Young Americans a generation later, Ingersoll argues that an exceptional degree of liberty can produce exceptional contributions to civilization.