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A Kantian Case for Libertarianism

by Jason Kuznicki on Jan 3, 2017

The ethical system of Immanuel Kant, properly understood, justifies libertarian political institutions.

essays

Utilitarians are Almost Right

by Richard Hildreth in 1844

Hildreth rejects the utilitarian standard of value—happiness—and concludes his book by connecting benevolence and virtue.

essays

Jackson Kills the Bank, Part Two

by Andrew Jackson on Jul 10, 1832

In our final portion from Jackson’s veto message, the president denies the Court’s authority to constrain his will and affirms states’ rights to monopoly banking.

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Jackson Kills the Bank, Part One

by Andrew Jackson on Jul 10, 1832

Jackson’s message looms large in the libertarian memory of early American history, but how often do we stop to interrogate his motivations?

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Mysticism, Happiness, or Virtue?

by Richard Hildreth in 1844

Hildreth continues his critique of mystical, egoist, and utilitarian ethics, maintaining that none established a firm and reliable standard of ethics.

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Libertarians and ‘Unicorn Governance’

by Anthony Comegna, Steven Horwitz, and Caleb O. Brown on Jan 25, 2017

An economist and historian discuss the strengths and weaknesses libertarians tend to exhibit when communicating with new audiences and dealing with new ideas.

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Individuals and Their Actions

by Richard Hildreth in 1844

Hildreth introduces the wide variety of competing ethical theories available to nineteenth century thinkers and begins exploring his own “forensic” theory.