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essays

“No Treason,” Annotated: Part IV

by Lysander Spooner in 1870

Spooner exposes the great Government Conspiracy and seeks to assign moral responsibility for the actions of a criminal gang shielded by mythological legitimacy.

essays

“No Treason,” Annotated: Part III

by Lysander Spooner in 1870

Spooner disabuses us of the notion that paying taxes or voting is equivalent to offering one’s consent to be governed.

essays

“No Treason,” Annotated: Part II

by Lysander Spooner in 1867

Having dispensed with the idea of consent to government, Spooner pivots to ask—Whose Constitution is it, anyway?

essays

“No Treason,” Annotated: Part I

by Lysander Spooner in 1867

Spooner begins his most important work by attacking the idea that we have consented to be governed by the United States government.

essays

An Ethical Intuitionist Case for Libertarianism

by Michael Huemer on Jan 3, 2017

The justification of libertarian political institutions follows logically from relatively uncontroversial moral intuitions held by a broad range of reasonable people.

essays

The Encantadas: Two Sides to a Tortoise

by Herman Melville in 1856

In his literary sketches of the Galapagos Islands, Melville sees a lens through which individuals can fully explore existence, power, liberty, and responsibility.