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After Nestor: The Mother of Violence

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

After surveying a string of possible arsons (by communists, for insurance fraud) and the Haymarket Square bombing, Tucker advises against all violence.

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After Nestor: Fetishizing Ballots & Bombs

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker advised anarchists to stay away from both ballot boxes and cartridge boxes. Using force only ever causes more trouble and weakens liberty.

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After Nestor: Making Anarchy Happen

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

From withdrawing every sort of tax revenue to trans-Atlantic reform associations, Tucker argues that ‘passive resistance’ can kill the state.

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The Lamb’s War: A Lamb’s Armor

by James Nayler in 1657

Despite two decades (and more) of conservative suppression, radical Quakerism lived on over the ages thanks to pamphlets like Nayler’s.

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After Nestor: Picketing Henry George

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

In a brief flurry of choice editorials, Tucker returns again to “picket duty,” addressing some of the many differences between himself and contemporary Henry George.

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After Nestor: Liberty as the Great Equalizer

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

For Tucker, Liberty was The Great Abolitionist, smasher of profit, rent, monopoly, and any other social contrivance separating labor from its fruits.

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Poor Man’s Pudding/Rich Man’s Crumbs

by Herman Melville in 1854

With a taste of actual poverty and a whiff of fake charity, Melville leaves us doubting whether our personal ethics have much improved.

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The Tartarus of Maids

by Herman Melville April 1855

Melville suggests that unless the modernizing, industrializing world retained its humanistic sensibilities, we’ll create our own Hells.

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The Paradise of Bachelors

by Herman Melville April 1855

Melville provides a more-or-less first-hand account of the almost excruciatingly lucious lives of London’s lawyerly elite.

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After Nestor: Land, Rent, and the State

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker squares off with a land-taxing Georgist reader whose preoccupation with land distracts him from the larger war against Archism.

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After Nestor: Henry George and State Socialism

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker chastises the naive libertarianism of Henry George’s land reformers—Land alone feeds no one, and a free society first requires a free money.

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After Nestor: The Knights of Paper Promises

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker goes back on “picket duty,” tackling a slew of money- and trade-related topics and battling foes from the Knights of Labor to Henry George.