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The Rise of Modern States

by Condorcet in 1795

For our author, the print revolution ushered in both an unstoppable flood of progress and the massive, abosolute, bureaucratic central state.

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Modernizing Philosophy

by Condorcet in 1795

Whether rationalists or empiricists, the first modern philosophers gave us all good reasons to doubt the dictates of either kings or priests.

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The Print Revolution

by Condorcet in 1795

No mere whig historian, Condorcet recognized that alongside wonderful, liberty-maximizing inventions like printing came modern states and global slavery.

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After Nestor: Karl Marx as Friend and Foe

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Reflecting on the death of Karl Marx, Tucker proclaims his high regard for Marx-as-Egalitarian…and his disgust for Marx-as-Authoritarian.

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After Nestor: Immigrants Love Liberty

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker blasts notions that immigrants come bearing crime and socialism, argues for atheism, and heaps praise on Auberon Herbert.

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After Nestor: The Pittsburgh Forge-Master

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Reacting to the deadly fiasco at Homestead, Pennsylvania, Tucker renews his alliance with labor in the face of industrialized corporate-capitalism.

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After Nestor: The Chicago Martyrs

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Despite his initial reactions, Tucker settles in to sympathize with the “martyrs” convicted of and executed for the Haymarket Square bombing.

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After Nestor: The Mother of Violence

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

After surveying a string of possible arsons (by communists, for insurance fraud) and the Haymarket Square bombing, Tucker advises against all violence.

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After Nestor: Fetishizing Ballots & Bombs

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker advised anarchists to stay away from both ballot boxes and cartridge boxes. Using force only ever causes more trouble and weakens liberty.

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After Nestor: Making Anarchy Happen

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

From withdrawing every sort of tax revenue to trans-Atlantic reform associations, Tucker argues that ‘passive resistance’ can kill the state.

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The Lamb’s War: A Lamb’s Armor

by James Nayler in 1657

Despite two decades (and more) of conservative suppression, radical Quakerism lived on over the ages thanks to pamphlets like Nayler’s.

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After Nestor: Picketing Henry George

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

In a brief flurry of choice editorials, Tucker returns again to “picket duty,” addressing some of the many differences between himself and contemporary Henry George.