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After Nestor: Land, Rent, and the State

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker squares off with a land-taxing Georgist reader whose preoccupation with land distracts him from the larger war against Archism.

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After Nestor: Henry George and State Socialism

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker chastises the naive libertarianism of Henry George’s land reformers—Land alone feeds no one, and a free society first requires a free money.

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After Nestor: The Knights of Paper Promises

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker goes back on “picket duty,” tackling a slew of money- and trade-related topics and battling foes from the Knights of Labor to Henry George.

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After Nestor: Free Money First

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker confronts Greenbackers and other contemporaries who posed state solutions to problems caused by government.

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Jimmy Rose: Failure & Sympathy

by Herman Melville in 1855

A failure at business and a failure at life, Jimmy Rose was a lot like the rest of his generation—drowning in change.

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A Virtue Ethical Case for Libertarianism

by Mark LeBar on Jan 3, 2017

Libertarian political institutions are most conducive to virtuous living, and virtuous people will be inclined to uphold libertarian principles.

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Crusaders, Inventors, and Classicists

by Condorcet in 1795

While Renaissance artists and intellectuals rediscovered, revived, and revered, tinkering inventors drove progress into its next epochal period. 

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After Nestor: The Popery of Gold!

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker compares the human idolatry of gold to religious worship, looking forward to the day when every man pulls his own metals from the sea.

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After Nestor: Between Communism & Monopoly

by Benjamin Tucker and Auberon Herbert in 1897

Tucker rejoins the trans-Atlantic dialogue between his American Spoonerite anarchists and the English Individualists.

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There’s No Tyranny Like English Tyranny

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Aug. 1840-March 1841

Offering his dismal reflections on the World Anti-Slavery Convention, Rogers reminds readers that the abolitionist revolution is no bureaucratic body.

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“The Lexicography of Hell”

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Dec. 1839-April 1840

Rogers explains how northerners, too, were complicit in slavery and cautions that political revolution alone would not create an abolitionist society.

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“Amidst the Universal Darkness”

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet surveys the dismal feudal era, but highlights its greatest triumph—the libertarian moment when slavery disappeared across Europe.

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The Decline and Fall of Ancient Empiricism

by Condorcet in 1795

Condorcet believed secular sectarianism was the primary cause of ancient philosophy’s decline, but Christian dogmatism sure didn’t help.

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After Nestor: A Smattering of Subjects

by Benjamin Tucker on Nov 1, 1897

In a troubling set of quotations, Tucker derides age of consent laws, displays plenty of misogyny, and shows more concern for butter than child welfare.

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After Nestor: Liquor & Tariffs

by Benjamin Tucker in 1897

Tucker squares off with a reader and fellow editor who suggests some monopolies are necessary for liberty to thrive.