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William Lloyd Garrison

An ardent abolitionist and supporter of the women’s suffrage movement, William Lloyd Garrison is perhaps best known as the editor of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, and as one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

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Man Cannot Hold Property in Man

by William Lloyd Garrison on Dec 13, 1833

William Lloyd Garrison argues that slavery was a direct violation of each person’s ownership of himself.

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Lions in New Hampshire

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers June 4-Sept. 10, 1841

In a community-building activist junket, Rogers and William Lloyd Garrison hunt for honest souls in the forests and hills of New Hampshire.

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Why Has Liberty Flourished in the West?

by Jim Powell on Sep 1, 2000

Powell examines the expansion of liberty in western culture and covers the history of free thinkers from Cicero to Ayn Rand.

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O’Connell, Anti-Slavery, and Freedom

by Literature of Liberty Reviewer on Dec 1, 1979

“O’Connell stood steadfast in his commitment to abolish human slavery even when it undermined his lifelong ambition to achieve home rule for Ireland.”

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Editorial (Vol. I, No. III)

by Leonard P. Liggio on Sep 1, 1978

Leonard Liggio described the ideologically-inspired, Romantic life of George Julian.

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Editorial: Benjamin Tucker and Liberty

by Leonard P. Liggio on Sep 1, 1981

“Tucker and his tradition…offer us the legacy of a suggestive analysis of how true community is compatible with rugged individualism.”

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Jack and Jill and Two Kinds of Freedom

by George H. Smith on Sep 11, 2012

Smith analyzes two kinds of freedom, pragmatic and moral, and gives examples of how this distinction has been used in the history of libertarian thought.

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There’s No Tyranny Like English Tyranny

by Nathaniel Peabody Rogers Aug. 1840-March 1841

Offering his dismal reflections on the World Anti-Slavery Convention, Rogers reminds readers that the abolitionist revolution is no bureaucratic body.

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You Are a Man And So Am I

by Frederick Douglass on Sep 3, 1848

Frederick Douglass argues that slavery “destroys the central principle of human responsibility” and violates the Constitution in three short essays.