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William Lloyd Garrison

An ardent abolitionist and supporter of the women’s suffrage movement, William Lloyd Garrison is perhaps best known as the editor of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, and as one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

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Strategies for a Libertarian Victory

by Murray Rothbard on Jul 1, 1978

“The Libertarian Party is a vital organ of the libertarian movement, even if it never elects anyone to major office.”

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O’Connell, Anti-Slavery, and Freedom

by Literature of Liberty Reviewer on Dec 1, 1979

“O’Connell stood steadfast in his commitment to abolish human slavery even when it undermined his lifelong ambition to achieve home rule for Ireland.”

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Slavery

by Various Authors on Dec 2, 1978

Literature of Liberty reviews a slew of major historians’ recent studies of a subject far too often neglected in libertarian circles.

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Editorial (Vol. I, No. III)

by Leonard P. Liggio on Sep 1, 1978

Leonard Liggio described the ideologically-inspired, Romantic life of George Julian.

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Feminism and Liberty’s Emancipation Sequence

by Mikayla Novak on Jan 15, 2016

Feminism is part of an interlocking family of movements aimed at human liberation, and indeed helping to achieve it, albeit in fits and starts.

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Tolstoy’s Christian Non-Resistance

by David S. D’Amato on Dec 30, 2015

Tolstoy’s radical Christianity led him to a pacifistic, anarchistic political philosophy that rejected the state as incompatible with Christ’s teachings.

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Free Love: Angela and Ezra Heywood

by David S. D’Amato on Feb 13, 2015

Sex radicals Angela and Ezra Haywood published the periodical The Word, often battling censors in their effort to get government out of the bedroom.

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The Radical Abolitionists, Part 2

by David S. D’Amato on Jan 7, 2014

D’Amato looks at the Garrisonians, the most diehard and arguably most consistently libertarian of the abolitionists.

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The Radical Abolitionists

by David S. D’Amato on Dec 2, 2013

The radical libertarian abolitionists thought it was senseless to attack slavery while defending the institutions that upheld it.