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John Locke

Nicknamed the “Father of Liberalism,” Locke’s theories have formed the foundation of many important works, including the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Constitution. His theories of social contract, the mind, and property are perhaps the most widely known.

essays

Editorial: John Locke

by Leonard P. Liggio on Mar 1, 1980

“Locke’s own extensive knowledge of travel literature suggests that he may have edited a major series of voyage literature.”

essays

Understanding Can Not Be Compelled

by John Locke in 1689

John Locke argues for liberty of conscience which he calls “every man’s natural right,” in this selection from A Letter Concerning Toleration.

essays

Of Property and Government

by John Locke in 1689

John Locke lays out the foundational arguments of liberalism: people have rights preexisting government, and government exists to protect those rights.

essays

Two Treatises of Government: Demoting Adam

by John Locke in 1689

To begin our series on the book that practically made modern political philosophy, we join Locke in demoting Adam from global dictator to mere father.

encyclopedia

Locke, John (1632-1704)

by Eric Mack on Aug 15, 2008

John Locke’s work on natural rights, property, and the limits of just governments makes him a central philosopher among classical liberals.

columns

John Locke: A Leveller Connection?

by George H. Smith on Dec 18, 2015

Smith examines and criticizes Richard Ashcraft’s arguments that Locke was significantly influenced by the Levellers.

Excursions

John Locke: A Leveller Connection?

featuring George H. Smith on May 16, 2018

Smith examines and criticizes Richard Ashcraft’s arguments that Locke was significantly influenced by the Levellers.

columns

John Locke: Hermeneutics and Labor

by George H. Smith on Oct 23, 2015

Smith explains Locke’s ideas about how we should interpret a philosophic text, and the relationship between labor and private property.

Excursions

John Locke: Hermeneutics and Labor

featuring George H. Smith on Apr 11, 2018

George H. Smith explains Locke’s ideas on how we should interpret a philosophic text, and the relationship between labor and private property.