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Robert Nozick

Philosopher Robert Nozick’s Anarchy, State, and Utopia, published in 1974, cemented libertarianism’s place among the political philosophies taken seriously in academia. In it, Nozick defended the “minimal state”—what latter came to be called minarchism—and showed how it could become a “framework for utopias.”

But Nozick’s interests weren’t limited to political theory. He turned his remarkable mind to nearly every branch of philosophy in such wide-ranging works as Philosophical Explanations, The Examined Life, and Invariances: The Structure of the Objective World.

columns

An Introduction

by Julian Sanchez on Nov 3, 2011

Julian Sanchez discusses his perspective and philosphical interests.

Free Thoughts

Objections to Libertarianism (with Eric Mack)

featuring Aaron Ross Powell, Trevor Burrus, and Eric Mack on May 10, 2019

Eric Mack joins our show again to talk about common objections to libertarianism by dissecting John Rawls viewpoint. 

columns

How Not to Argue Against Libertarianism

by Aaron Ross Powell on Aug 15, 2013

Cogently attacking libertarianism means, at the very least, wrestling with what libertarians actually believe.

essays

Critics of Liberty: A Reading List

by Aaron Ross Powell on Nov 3, 2011

A guide to the books and essays containing the most powerful arguments against libertarianism.

columns

Libertarianism and Virtue

by Aaron Ross Powell on May 3, 2013

An introduction to virtue, the life well-lived, and the state’s role in the good life.

essays

Libertarian Theory: A Reading List

by Aaron Ross Powell on Nov 3, 2011

A selection of books to take readers beyond the basics of libertarianism and into the philosophy and economics that provide its foundations.

encyclopedia

Anarchism

by Bryan Caplan on Aug 15, 2008

The most minimal proposed form of state organization, anarchism, is the philosophy of the absence of government.

essays

Editorial: Social Order & Economics

by Leonard P. Liggio on Jun 1, 1982

“There are many aspects of society (most of the interesting aspects) that can be understood and explained only through the use of invisible hand explanations.”

encyclopedia

Voluntarism

by Wendy McElroy on Aug 15, 2008

Voluntarism argues that individuals should not be coerced into “socially beneficial” projects, but should act voluntarily to assist others.