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William Lloyd Garrison

An ardent abolitionist and supporter of the women’s suffrage movement, William Lloyd Garrison is perhaps best known as the editor of the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator, and as one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

essays

Why Has Liberty Flourished in the West?

by Jim Powell on Sep 1, 2000

Powell examines the expansion of liberty in western culture and covers the history of free thinkers from Cicero to Ayn Rand.

columns

The Liberty Party

by George H. Smith on May 14, 2018

Smith discusses some circumstances that led to the formation of the abolitionist Liberty Party in 1840.

essays

O’Connell, Anti-Slavery, and Freedom

by Literature of Liberty Reviewer on Dec 1, 1979

“O’Connell stood steadfast in his commitment to abolish human slavery even when it undermined his lifelong ambition to achieve home rule for Ireland.”

columns

Abolitionism: The Schism Over Voting

by George H. Smith on Jan 27, 2017

Smith discusses the split in the American Anti-Slavery Society over voting, equal rights for women, and other causes.

essays

Editorial (Vol. I, No. III)

by Leonard P. Liggio on Sep 1, 1978

Leonard Liggio described the ideologically-inspired, Romantic life of George Julian.

essays

Editorial: Benjamin Tucker and Liberty

by Leonard P. Liggio on Sep 1, 1981

“Tucker and his tradition…offer us the legacy of a suggestive analysis of how true community is compatible with rugged individualism.”

encyclopedia

Civil War, US

by Jeffrey Rogers Hummel on Aug 15, 2008

In this entry, Jeff Hummel explains the events and effects of the U.S. Civil War from the perspective of how it both questioned and realized liberty.

columns

Final Comments on Wendell Phillips and Non-Voting

by George H. Smith on Apr 7, 2017

Smith concludes his discussion of the no-voting theory of Wendell Phillips by explaining Phillips’s attitude toward taxes and the limits of democracy.

columns

Some Background on the Prohibition Movement

by George H. Smith on May 26, 2017

Smith explains some reasons why the temperance movement switched from advocating voluntary methods to calling for coercive prohibitory laws during the 1830s.

columns

The Constitution and Slavery

by George H. Smith on Jun 23, 2017

Smith discusses the schism in the abolitionist movement over the constitutionality of slavery, and he begins his analysis of Lysander Spooner’s arguments in The Unconstitutionality of Slavery.