Jul 20, 2018

The Problem with “Fake News”

History of Fake News

On August 13th, 1678, King Charles II was informed of an elaborate Catholic conspiracy to take his life. A manuscript, discovered just a few days prior, named nearly 100 English Jesuits as part of a plot to reinstate Catholic power in Protestant England. The King found the whole thing absurd, and wanted it kept quiet to avoid mass panic. Word, however, got out, prompting an investigation that led the magistrate to the fervently anti-Catholic Titus Oates.

Publication date

In many fields, regression analysis is the foundation of the most complex statistical analysis. Gujarati and Porter’s book is more mathematically heavy than the other works in this list but provides a good introduction to regression analysis.

The Schaum’s Outline series can be used as references or read as books. This book, along with Schaum’s Outline of Statistics, provides a good first step for people looking to learn how to compute statistics in addition to understanding what statistics tell us.

The Schaum’s Outline series can be used as references or read as books. This book, along with Schaum’s Outline of Probability and Statistics, provides a good first step for people looking to learn how to compute statistics in addition to understanding what statistics tell us.

“Equality, Liberty, Prosperity” appeared in Social Philosophy and Policy, Volume 31, Issue 2. Written for non-statisticians, the article takes a statistical view of the relationship between more versus less restrictive economic policies and socioeconomic outcomes such as income, poverty, inequality, and population growth. The article asks whether differing levels of government control of economies across states and across time is associated with differing quality-of-life outcomes. This article is a good follow-up to this book for people who are interested in the application of statistical analysis to social and economic questions.

Antony Davies’s companion volume for this guide, Understanding Statistics: An Introduction, explains how to understand the statistical claims that one encounters in the study of economics and in daily life.

The freer the markets people live in, the better they flourish. This book explains why that is so, in terms of foundational economic principles. Free of graphs and economic jargon, it uses thought experiments and examples to give the reader an intuitive understanding of spontaneous economic order.

This book, appropriately subtitled “A Common Sense Guide to the Economy,” is a rich and rewarding exploration of the fundamental facts and principles of economics. Its engaging writing and broad range of illustrative examples make learning economics relaxed and enjoyable.

Rightly billed as “the shortest and surest way to understand basic economics,” this book has been the most valuable book in my economics education. In short, lucid chapters, it teaches how to think about economic policies and problems such as taxes, tariffs, subsidies, rent controls, minimum wage laws, unions, profits, and inflation. It’s superb.

Howard Baetjer’s companion volume to this guide offers a short introduction to economics and the market economy.