Barnett discusses a variety of methods for constraining state power.

Randy E. Barnett is a lawyer and legal theorist, and a Senior Fellow of the Cato Institute. He is the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory at Georgetown University. Barnett writes about the libertarian theory of law and contract theory, constitutional law, and jurisprudence and is especially interested in the history and original meaning of the Second and Ninth Amendments to the United States Constitution.

Professor Randy E. Barnett teaches constitutional law and contracts at the Georgetown University Law Center. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. In this 1997 lecture from a meeting of the International Society of Individual Liberty he speaks broadly on various methods of constraining state power including federalism and the separation of powers, the power of exit, and existing and theoretical polycentric legal orders. Barnett suggests that two simple rules must be present for polycentric orders to work: a “nonconfiscation principle,” and a “competition principle.”