Palmer and Leube discuss a recently‐​released paper by Leube on social justice, adapted from his 1989 book, A ‘Hayekian’ Critique of Social Justice.

Tom G. Palmer is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, director of the Institute’s educational division, Cato University, Executive Vice President for International Programs at Atlas Network, and author of Realizing Freedom: Libertarian Theory, History, and Practice, among other works.

Kurt Leube is a historian of economic thought, with an emphasis on Austrian economics, and a scholar of law and economics and economic philosophy. He is also a Professor in the Department of Economics at California State University, Hayward; a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; and Professor and Academic Director of the International Institute for Austrian Economics.

Tom G. Palmer is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute, director of the Institute’s educational division, Cato University, Vice President for International Programs at the Atlas Economic Research Foundation, and General Director of the Atlas Global Initiative for Free Trade, Peace, and Prosperity.

Kurt Leube is a historian of economic thought, with an emphasis on Austrian economics, and a scholar of law and economics and economic philosophy. He is also a Professor in the Department of Economics at California State University, Hayward; a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; and Professor and Academic Director of the International Institute for Austrian Economics.

In this video from a seminar in Aix‐​en‐​Provence, France in 1995, Palmer and Leube discuss a recently‐​released paper by Leube on social justice, adapted from his 1989 book, A ‘Hayekian’ Critique of Social Justice. Palmer makes five key points regarding the nature of the welfare state and distributive justice, and Leube responds. The French‐​only portions of the Q&A period were edited out of this video because of time constraints.

Note: This lecture was delivered to a mostly French‐​speaking audience. ‘Liberal’ in French should be considered to translate as ‘classical liberal’ or ‘libertarian’ in modern American parlance.