In his new book, Pennington defends the classical liberal focus on markets and the minimal state from the critiques presented by “market failure” economics.

David Boaz is the executive vice president of the Cato Institute and has played a key role in the development of the Cato Institute and the libertarian movement. He is the author of The Libertarian Mind: A Manifesto for Freedom and the editor of The Libertarian Reader.

Boaz is a provocative commentator and a leading authority on domestic issues such as education choice, drug legalization, the growth of government, and the rise of libertarianism. Boaz is the former editor of New Guard magazine and was executive director of the Council for a Competitive Economy prior to joining Cato in 1981. The earlier edition of The Libertarian Mind, titled Libertarianism: A Primer, was described by the Los Angeles Times as “a well‐​researched manifesto of libertarian ideas.” His other books include The Politics of Freedom and the Cato Handbook for Policymakers.

His articles have been published in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, National Review, and Slate, and he wrote the entry on libertarianism for Encyclopedia Britannica. Finally he is a frequent guest on national television and radio shows.

Mark Pennington is a senior lecturer in political economy in the Department of Politics, Queen Mary, at the University of London. He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics. His main research interests center on Hayekian and public choice analyses of the regulatory state, with a particular focus on environmental policy.

Featuring the author Mark Pennington, Professor of Politics, University of London; moderated by David Boaz, Executive Vice President, Cato Institute. This new book offers a comprehensive defense of classical liberalism against contemporary challenges. It sets out an analytical framework of “robust political economy” that explores the economic and political problems that arise from the fact of imperfect knowledge and imperfect incentives. Using this framework, the book defends the classical liberal focus on markets and the minimal state from the critiques presented by “market failure” economics and communitarian and egalitarian variants of political theory. Mark Pennington applies the lessons learned from responding to these challenges in the context of contemporary discussions surrounding the welfare state, international development, and environmental protection. Thinkers addressed include Joseph Stiglitz, Jurgen Habermas, Karl Polanyi, John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin. Uniquely, the book explores the lessons learned from responding to these critics in the context of contemporary discussions surrounding the welfare state, international development, and environmental protection. The book has been described by Professor Bruce Caldwell, general editor of The Collected Works of F.A. Hayek, as “almost custom‐​made for those who want to defend classical liberalism against the common arguments.”